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Cellulite Can Be Caused By Menopause January 13, 2010

Posted by feminestra in Health, Healthy living, Menopause.
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Ask any woman what cellulite is and they will tell you that it is “those disgusting dimples you get when you are fat.” It has viewed as a major problem for women for the past decade being blasted by celebrity gossip magazines over and over again. It has been a medical mystery, until just recently, as to why cellulite forms, and why it seems to get worse as women get older.

It is well known that cellulite is not just a “fat person’s problem” as cellulite can form in women with as little as 15 percent body fat. Cellulite is also not just excess fat around the legs and thighs. Prior to menopause, cellulite is caused by two things; decreases circulation deep in skin tissue, and inflammation due to insufficient lymphatic drainage. Other things that can worsen this condition include poor diet or sluggish digestion, and no or too much exercise.

However, after menopause hormone imbalances start to become a factor for cellulite formation. Studies now show that excess estrogen may cause connective tissue in the skin to weaken allowing fat to collect and push up the skin in little bundles. Adding excess estrogen to the mix with poor circulation in the skin and poor lymphatic drainage, you are left with the preverbal “Perfect Storm” for cellulite formation. As women go through menopause their skin begins to thin and collagen and elastin, elements of the skin that make it elastic and tight, levels start to deplete. This only makes a bad situation worse as it worsens the appearance of the skin.

However, it is not the end of life as we know it for those who have cellulite. In fact there are things that you can do to not necessarily cure, but improve the look of cellulite. There are a number of different creams and lotions on the market that advertise they will make your cellulite disappear. Although many of these are illegitimate and are nothing more than snake-oil in a bottle, there are some that actually work. Several vitamins and minerals have been shown to improve blood flow and circulation in the skin. Massages also help with lymphatic circulation which can improve the condition of cellulite.

Popular Supplement Proved Ineffective January 12, 2010

Posted by feminestra in Health, Healthy living, Prevention.
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The popular supplement ginkgo biloba was proved to be ineffective for preventing age-related mental diseases like dementia or Alzheimer’s. Studies also showed that it provides no benefit for those of normal mental states.

A clinical study, which spanned six years, studied the effects of ginkgo biloba in adults aged 72-96 showed that there was no measurable difference in cognition between those who used the placebo and those who did not. The patients were tested twice a year which measured various aspects of mental function such as attention span, memory, language, etc. Similar studies were conducted earlier in 2009 but tested the overall cognitive benefit from ginkgo biloba. No such evidence was found supporting the common belief in these studies as well.

However, critics state that mental decline is caused by a number of different factors and there is no fix all cure. The Council for Responsible Nutrition also recommends that the study should not be viewed as the final work on ginkgo biloba. Many doctors say that they have seen the benefits of ginkgo biloba first hand and will continue to recommend it to patients.

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Lose Weight After Menopause January 8, 2010

Posted by feminestra in Health, Healthy living, Menopause.
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Going through menopause is generally not a fun time for women (or their husbands for that matter). They have to deal with ever occurring hot flashes and night sweats, mood swings, sleeplessness, depression, and the list just keeps going. These symptoms can last for a few years making the end a joyous occasion, almost. Many women find that they gain weight during menopause and it tends to stick around longer than menopause, and woman, being the self conscious beings they are, tend to stress about the extra pounds. Generally, the weight gain is not to extreme for most women gaining about 10-20 pounds. Good thing there is a simple way to get rid of the excess weight without killing yourself at the gym.

Eating a healthy is the first step to weight loss. Today’s society is filled with fast foods, sugary drinks, and other equally unhealthy things that we all consume. Cutting all that junk food out for your diet will help you lose the weight quickly. This includes any fast food, sodas, most frozen dinners, crazy Starbucks concoctions, and other foods high in fat. This doesn’t mean you have to stop eating foods that you like or stop eating out all together. You can still eat deserts and go to restaurants, but keep it in moderation. If you still work, try either packing a lunch or healthy frozen lunch instead of eating at Burger King every day.

When eating at home remember portion control. Take a look at the nutrition fact before cooking for yourself and look at how many servings there are in the container. A lot of people today believe they are eating healthy based on what the nutrition facts say, but they eat two or three servings at a time. A great example is a Marie Calendar’s chicken pot pie frozen dinner. The average person would not have a problem finishing a 16oz pot pie by themselves, and it seems like a fairly healthy dinner; roughly 650 calories per serving. But what a lot of people do not look at is a 16oz pot pie contains two 8oz servings bringing the actual calorie count closer to 1,300 calories. This is 65 percent of a 2,000 calorie diet in one meal! You do not necessarily have to start counting calories, but you should be aware of about how many you take in each meal and smaller portions will help keep the number low. There are a number of online calculators that will tell you the ideal number of calories you should take in for your weight. Some will also tell you how to adjust your diet to reach your target weight by a certain target date.

Exercise is also an essential part to weight loss. A lot of older people, especially women, are hesitant to go to a gym because they think they have to work themselves to death to see any results. This is not true; in fact light to moderate exercise four times a week will provide you will outstanding results. Besides helping you lose weight, exercise will give you more energy for everyday life and make you feel better by improving your general mood. The thing to remember when working out for weight loss is that you are not necessary trying to build a bunch of muscle. Instead you are going to strengthen and tone the muscle you already have which will burn off excess fat fast.

To tone muscle you should do high numbers of repetitions with light weight. Aim for three sets of 15-20 repetitions each. You should also chose a weight that will allow you to complete all three sets with relative ease. The last set should be the hardest of the three, if not then chose a higher weight. When working out it is best to work muscle groups versus doing a whole body work out. You will recover faster and you will see better results sooner. There are three main muscle groups or pairings that can be worked; back and biceps, chest and triceps, and legs. You should try to work only one muscle group per workout day. Core and auxiliary muscles, which include abs, shoulders, and neck, can be worked in with the main groups on your workout days at your digression.

Cardio is another exercise that should be done at least 30 minutes a day, three or four times a week. Running the one of the more popular cardio exercises, but many older people find that this puts too much stress on their legs and that they are doing more harm than good. Biking is a good alternative as it greatly reduces the stress on the legs and many people enjoy it better. For those who wish to stay indoors for their cardio workout for whatever reason you can find cardio machines at most gyms. These include treadmills, stair steppers, stationary bikes, and elliptical machines.

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Lose Weight After Menopause by Feminestra is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Long-term Tamoxifen Use Increases Risk of Aggressive Breast Cancer September 30, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Breast Cancer, Health.
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In one of my recent post, I said that the drug Tamoxifen, which was approved by the FDA, reduced the risk of breast cancer up to 50%. However, in an article released today, a study found that Tamoxifen may in fact cause some breast cancers.
Long-term Tamoxifen Use Increases Risk of Aggressive Breast Cancer « Web of Evidence: What They Don’t Want You To Know

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), side effects of the drug range from hot flashes, vaginal dryness, joint pain and leg cramps to blood clots, cataracts, strokes and uterine cancer. Understandably, many women are willing to accept these risks because they are told tamoxifen decreases their chance for a recurrence of breast cancer. However, a new study by Christopher Li, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center just published online in the journal Cancer Research seems to reveal the belief that tamoxifen protects against breast cancer is only partially correct. The drug may also cause certain breast cancers.

Yes, breast-cancer patients who receive long-term estrogen-blocker tamoxifen therapy have a 60 percent reduction in their incidence of a second, ER positive breast cancer — a common type of breast cancer which tends not to be aggressive and is responsive to estrogen-blocking therapy. But the new research shows tamoxifen increases the risk of the women developing a second and far more dangerous type of breast cancer by a stunning 440 percent….

If you are currently using this drug please contact your doctor to find out if you are at risk for more aggressive breast cancer and if you should be taking another type of drug.
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Video: Menopause Pt. 2 September 25, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Feminestra, Health, Menopause, senior health.
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Symptoms of Menopause

Video: Menopause Pt.1 September 24, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Feminestra, Health, Menopause.
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Understanding Menopause

Video: Osteoporosis Pt. 2 September 23, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Feminestra, Health, Osteoporosis.
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Consequences of Osteoporosis

Video: Osteoporosis Pt. 1 September 22, 2009

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What is Osteoporosis

Life After Menopause: Osteoporosis September 14, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Feminestra, Health, Prevention.
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Contents
Causes
Menopause
Symptoms
Risk Factors
Prevention

Osteoporosis is a disease which weakens bones making them more prone to breakage. Many times, osteoporosis is not found until a fracture has already happened, which, unfortunately, increases the risk of having another fracture due to the disease. It is hard to catch osteoporosis early because it does not have any visible or painful symptoms. However, there are steps that you can take to prevent the onset of osteoporosis, or slow the progression if you already have the disease.

Causes

The exact cause of osteoporosis is not yet known, however, we do know how it develops. Bones consist of two parts, a hard outer shell, and a sponge-like inner core. Your bones, like most of your body, are made up of living tissue which grows and dies just like any other tissue in your body. Normally, the body can build more bone than it loses. But when a bone is weakened osteoporosis: Before and Afterby osteoporosis, the inner core becomes less dense and loses mass. In other words, the “holes” in the “sponge” part of your bones become larger. This loss in bone mass is a normal part of the aging process starting around the age of 30, but when it reaches a certain point then osteoporosis has set in.

Menopause

Osteoporosis has been linked to menopause as well. The lack of estrogen and absence of menstrual periods can cause and/or accelerate the progression of osteoporosis. Women who have or are experiencing early menopause are at an even greater risk for the disease.

Symptoms

Symptoms of osteoporosis may not be initially seen until the disease has progressed quite a bit. It is often called the “silent disease” because many people do not know they have osteoporosis uosteoporosisntil they suddenly break a bone. The symptoms that do show, besides a broken bone, may be stooped posture, loss of height, and back pain caused by collapsed vertebrae. To determine if you have osteoporosis you should receive a bone mineral density (BMD) test. These are painless, accurate test using low-power x-rays to determine bone strength. These tests can provide information about your bone health and determine if you have osteoporosis before problems begin.

Risk Factors

There are several risk factors that are linked to osteoporosis. These include age, gender, ethnicity, bone structure, and family history. Maximum bone density is reached around the age of 30 after which, bone mass begins to decline naturally with age. The greatest risk for the disease occurs around the age of 50. Women are also at a higher risk for the disease, as much as four times as likely as men. This may be due to women’s naturally lighter, thinner bones, longer life spans, and loss of estrogen due to menopause. Ethnicity also plays a big part in the onset of osteoporosis. Studies have shown that Caucasian and Asian women have the greatest risk for the disease. Studies also showed that Caucasian women are more likely to have hip fractures then Asian and African-American women. Your natural body structure may also put you at a greater risk. People who have smaller frames are at a greater risk for the disease because they have less bone to lose than people that have bigger frames. Probably the biggest factor for whether or not you may get osteoporosis is your family history. If your parents or grandparents had or showed signs of osteoporosis, you may be at a greater risk of the disease.

Prevention

There are ways to protect against the onset or progression of osteoporosis. Most of these are simple lifestyle and dietary changes that can have a greatly change your risk for the disease. Exercise is a good way to help make your bones stronger and prevent bone loss. Try to establish a regular exercise program that has you doingmilk weight-bearing exercises at least four times a week. These can be as simple as jogging, playing tennis, and dancing. Your diet plays a big role is the health of your bones. Try to increase your intake of calcium (1,500mg a day) which can be found in milk, salmon, and dark green vegetables, and vitamin D (400-800 IU a day) which can be found in eggs, fortified milk, and fatty fish like salmon. Also limiting your alcohol consumption and not smoking can reduce your risk.

Osteoporosis can be a debilitating disease, even deadly. However, there are steps that can be taken to prevent or slow the progression of the disease. Those preventative steps will help you live a longer, healthier life.

Feminestra

Life After Menopause: Tests and Screenings to Protect your Health September 9, 2009

Posted by feminestra in Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Early Menopause, Feminestra, Health, Healthy living, Prevention.
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Menopause is a very important life transition for women. It signals a new period of life for women with its own inherent risks. After and during menopause, the body starts to change in ways that might not be apparent at first, but can lead to so serious health risks if not correctly managed. You may be aware of some of these risks already, risks such as osteoporosis, breast cancer, and cervical cancer, and are receiving regular screenings for these conditions. However, there are several other conditions that you should be aware of.

Heart Diseaseheart disease
Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American women. Because of this, you should have cholesterol screenings at least every five years, regardless of age. This should also be done with routine blood pressure tests. Your doctor may also recommend other related tests to check your hearts overall function and its response to different types of stress and activities. A recent study found a correlation between menopause symptoms and risk for heart disease, which found that woman with the worst menopause symptoms have the highest clinical risk for heart disease.

Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis, as you may know, is the thinning of thosteoporosise bones making them weaker and prone to breakage. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that women should have their bone density tested regularly starting at the age of 65. However, it is also recommended that women with a higher risk for osteoporosis should start screening at the age of 50. Risks factors include early menopause, tobacco use, a small frame or low body mass, history of anorexia, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, and/or a family history of osteoporosis. Bone density screenings are usually non-invasive, outpatient procedures. The two most common tests are ultrasound and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).


cancer screeningColon Cancer
Around the time that you begin menopause screening for colon cancer is a very good idea. Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Americans over the age of 50. A colonoscopy can detect this deadly cancer in its early stages which makes it a good idea to take advantage of this potentially lifesaving procedure. You should talk to your doctor about when to start these examinations and how often they should be conducted.

Breast Cancer
In one of our previous articles we talked about things that yobreast cancer prevention ribbonu can do to prevent breast cancer. As a review, you should start annual mammograms, if you have not done so. In addition to these screenings, you should conduct a self-breast exam every month. This is especially important after and during menopause as a woman’s chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer doubles after the age of 40. To learn more about breast cancer prevention please read “Breast Cancer Prevention”.

Menopause can be a trying part of life as you deal with all of the changes that your body goes through. To make sure you live to your full potential after this change, you should make these screenings and tests a part of your life. Don’t think of menopause as the end, rather as the beginning of a new chapter in the book of life, and make it a good read.

Feminestra

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Life After Menopause: Tests and Screenings to Protect your Health by Feminestra is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.